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We currently stock 40 S&W Once Fired Brass as well as 45 ACP, and 9mm.

40 S&W Auto Brass
45 Auto Brass
9mm Auto Brass

40 s&w once fired brass | 40 cal once fired brass | Red Dragon

40 S&W Once Fired Brass

For More Info about S&W 40 Click Here

All of our once fired brass is first inspected for defective cases. Next the cases are cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner. Finally they are gently tumbled in walnut media and sealed in air tight bags before shipment. Case heads are mixed. Each order includes 3% extra cases to ensure value to our customers.
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Price: from $18.95

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A Short History Of the S&W 40

The .40 S&W (10×22mm Smith & Wesson) is a rimless pistol cartridge developed jointly by major American firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester. The .40 S&W was developed from the ground up as a law enforcement cartridge designed to duplicate performance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s reduced-velocity 10mm Auto cartridge which could be retrofitted into medium-frame (9mm size) automatic handguns. It uses .40 inch (10.16mm) diameter bullets ranging in weight from 105 to 200 grains (6.8039 g to 13 g).

The .40 S&W cartridge debuted January 17, 1990, along with the new Smith & Wesson Model 4006 pistol, although it was several months before the pistols were available for purchase. Austrian manufacturer Glock Ges.m.b.H. beat Smith & Wesson to the dealer shelves in 1990, with pistols chambered in .40 S&W (the Glock 22 and 23) which were announced a week before the 4006. Glock’s rapid introduction was aided by its engineering of a pistol chambered in 10mm Auto, the Glock 20, only a short time earlier. Since the .40 S&W uses the same bore diameter and case head as the 10mm Auto, it was merely a matter of adapting the 10mm design to the shorter 9×19mm Parabellum frames. The new guns and ammunition were an immediate success.

The .40 S&W case length and overall cartridge length are shortened, but other dimensions except case web and wall thickness remain identical to the 10mm Auto. Both cartridges headspace on the mouth of the case. Thus in a semi-auto they are not interchangeable. Fired from a 10mm revolver the .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge will headspace on the extractor and the bullet will jump a .142 inch freebore just like a .38 Special fired from a .357 Magnum pistol. If the cartridge is not held by the extractor, the chances for a ruptured primer are great.[8] Smith and Wesson does make a double action revolver that can fire either at will using moon clips. A single-action revolver in the .38–40 chambering can also be modified to fire the .40 or the 10 mm if it has an extra cylinder. Most .40 caliber handguns can be easily converted to 9mm for cheaper target shooting with a simple barrel and magazine swap.

Performance

Preasures in this cartridge are relatively low making this a very easy cartridge to re-load. Its overwhelming popularity make 40 S&W Once Fired Brass fairly easy to come by.